154MC Under Represented Groups Within The Media.

Depression. 

In the UK there are over ten million people living with a disability. When we think of disability we often think of wheelchair users, we don’t begin to consider depression as being a disability. Depression is a common illness that can affect one in ten of us at some point in out lives, even children can suffer from depression.

The NHS says:

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.

We all go through spells of feeling down, but when you’re depressed, you feel persistently sad for weeks or months rather than just a few days.

Some people still think that depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They’re wrong. Depression is a real illness with real symptoms, and it’s not a sign of weakness or something you can ‘snap out of’ by ‘pulling yourself together’.

The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery from depression.

How to tell if you have depression.

Depression affects people in many different ways and can cause a wide variety of symptoms.

They range from lasting feelings of sadness and hopelessness to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy and feeling very tearful or anxious.

There can be physical symptoms too such as feeling constantly tired, sleeping badly, having no appetite or sex drive and complaining of various aches and pains.

At its mildest, you may simply feel persistently low in spirit, while at its most severe, depression can make you feel suicidal and that life is no longer worth living.

But don’t worry. There is treatment.

Treatment for depression involves either medication or talking treatments, or usually a combination of the two. The kind of treatment that your doctor recommends, will be based on the type of depression you have.

Many people with depression benefit by making lifestyle changes such as getting more exercise, cutting down on alcohol and eating more healthily.

For reference and for more information visit: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Depression/Pages/Introduction.aspx

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